ITALY AND THE COMING WORLD by Don Luigi Sturso

ITALY AND THE COMING WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The introduction by Summer Wlles gives one an assurance that in the author we have a man who has played a leading part in the creation of the Christian Democratic Party in Italy, a man who has served labor as a Catholic Liberal, a man who believes in the abolition of the monarchy and the ability of the Italian democratic elements to build for the future, provided the big powers give them a chance. His book, while at times it seems diffuse and evasive, in the main succeeds in giving one a sense of the surviving spirit of Italy, a realization of the deep roots of the democratic viewpoint and the brevity of the experiment in monarchy. He highlights the history of Italy, politically, socially; of the place of the Vatican in that history (he will seem uncritical here, when, for example, compared with Salvemini and La iana); he goes more fully into the processes by which Italy rather ingloriously took a part in World War I, the growth of fascism, the failure of the League when the Abyssinian adventure was undertaken, the part played by Italy in the Spanish Civil War, the shame of Munich, and the culmination of twenty years of antagonism against France in the mis-called ""stab in the back"". But ven here, there is no bitterness, but an extraordinary objectivity, as there is in his handling of Italy's overthrow of Mussolini and surrender -- and the subsequent anomly of her position as co-belligerent, with her efforts at a rebirth of democracy strangled by A and British intervention. pleads his case convincingly- makes one feel that, given a fair chance, Italy can take her place in the commity of nations -- and he charts the course that should be followed. He is forthright in his criticism of the procedure in shaping a new Europe, of the failure to apply the principles of the Atlantic Charter, of the obvious deal on spheres of influence. A useful book today, which deals in specific problems as well as broad principles, and avoids personalities -- which, perhaps, is discreet, but limits the appeal to a somewhat serious market.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1945
Publisher: Roy