GOD, MAN AND THE THINKER by Donald A. Wells
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GOD, MAN AND THE THINKER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A remarkably interesting survey of the various philosophies of religion which have claimed the attention of man the thinker through the ages. Mr. Donald A. Wells is careful to make clear to his readers that no philosophy of religion is a substitute for religion, just as philosophy of science is no substitute for science, but this panoramic sweep of man's philosophic probing into the mysteries of his own being in a finite world makes fascinating reading. The author assumes that the awareness of what philosophers of religion have no defense of either theism or atheism. Without bias toward one religion or against another, the book does help the religious person to see both the grounds and the limits of religious claims. No case is built up for the superiority of any particular religion. If this question is to be answered at all, it must be by religion and not philosophy. Though Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism are discussed at some length, the primary emphasis is on the major classical formulation of the traditions of Judaism, Catholicism and Protestantism. Varied points of view are presented as fairly and as positively as their staunchest supporters will permit. To all except those whose religious convictions preclude reflection and thought this book will be a most valuable introduction to the mind of man as he wrestles with the most profound problems of his existence.

Pub Date: June 13th, 1962
Publisher: Random House