HARALD AND THE GREAT STAG by Donald Carrick

HARALD AND THE GREAT STAG

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Returning to the medieval setting of Harald and the Giant Knight (1982), Carrick tells how a peasant boy is friendly with the Baron's hunters till he meets a legendary old stag and, won by his majestic bearing, plans to save him from the hunt. Although the old hunter warns him away from the forest where all the animals are ""for the Baron's sport, and his alone,"" he gathers the stag's droppings and confuses the trail--before realizing that the dogs are now likely to follow him. Though he escapes, he experiences enough of being the hunted to empathize more than ever with the stag--and discovers that the old hunter secretly shares his feeling. The feelings ascribed to Harald and the old hunter belong more to this century than to theirs; accordingly, the story serves better to deliver a 20th-century message than to shed light on life in medieval England. Carrick's bright, broadly executed watercolors satisfactorily evoke the craggy faces of the hunters and their wilderness; even better seen from a distance, they suit the story for use with groups. The relatively simple text and subject will also make the story useful for slower older readers.

Pub Date: April 4th, 1988
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Clarion/Ticknor & Fields