WILLIAM H. WELCH AND THE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN MEDICINE by Donald Fleming

WILLIAM H. WELCH AND THE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN MEDICINE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From primary sources, this is a professional- rather than personal biography of a great reformer, and a great educator, whose career spanned the old and the new medicine when it was learned that medicine was to depend upon a scientific knowledge of the nature of disease. And Welch, who was attracted to medicine through science- and not the trial and error physicking of his father- was to transform American medical schools from the worst to the best in the world. His studies at Yale, at Physicians & Surgeons, and in Germany led to pure research investigation, and with his return to New York he established the reform of medical education and instituted laboratory techniques and traditions. His appointment to Johns Hopkins inaugurated the golden age there when he brought Halsted and Osler and the anatomist Mall to join him there, encouraged the spread of an ""experimental temper"", introduced the laboratory regimen, and established standards of excellence... A sober study, which pays tribute to the accomplishments of the man, documents the reconstruction and re-invigoration of his profession, but demands a pre-established interest in the field.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1954
Publisher: Little, Brown