THE FORM OF A SERVANT by Donald G. Dawe

THE FORM OF A SERVANT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This volume undertakes a historical analysis of the Kenotic (""divine self-emptying"") motif in Christian theology. Motif is distinguished from doctrine as being more fundamental, pervasive, and varied in its expressions. In the New Testament the primary statement of this motif is seen as given in Philippians 2:5-11. The basic question with which the motif is concerned is stated by the author as being, ""How is the Jesus of history related to the Christ of faith?"" Two crucial periods in Christian history are identified as giving prominence to this motif: the first coming when the early church had to address the Graeco-Roman world; the second during the 19th century when the modern view of man as given by psychology and history began to develop. The historical account is carried forward from the New Testament period through the Hellenic age, the Reformation, the Hegelian phase, into the thought of 19th century England and on to the place of the motif in contemporary theologians, such as Barth and Brunner. The scholarship here appears to be methodical and solid, if somewhat pedestrian. A book for readers who wish to get a view of Christian thought on this doctrine which is having a new attraction in our day.

Pub Date: Jan. 13th, 1964
Publisher: Westminster