HENRY MOORE by Donald Hall

HENRY MOORE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Poet Donald Hall writes of sculptor Henry Moore in a glancing prose. Attractively informative rather than intimate, his book tells of the Moore days and years, from his birth as the seventh of eight children of a coal miner in Castleford to his present position as Henry Moore, C.H., O.M. (The Moore day begins at 7:30, when he rises to brew two cups of tea for himself and his wife Irina, whom he married in 1929.) Moore decided to become a sculptor, a great sculptor, at the age of ten. His first work was the Roll of Honour at Castleford Grammar School, his latest is the Lincoln Center Reclining Figure, a logical development of ""what happened in the mind, over sixty years of form experiences,"" the largest of his works. Donald Hall touches on private life and on public recognition, on the act and substance of the work itself.

Pub Date: April 27th, 1966
Publisher: Harper & Row