HOW NOT TO BUY A COMMON STOCK by Donald I. Rogers

HOW NOT TO BUY A COMMON STOCK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. Rogers is the former Business and Financial Editor of the former Herald Tribune and except for the juvenile-jocular nomenclature (Pete Professional; Lymphatic Lamp) this is an acceptable primer for the uninitiated investor. Knowing nothing, he should avail himself of the standard sources (avoiding those misleading inside tips) and a good broker who will advise him. Still that broker should not be given too much lebensraum. Assuming that you will be choosing a stock for both income and growth, he discusses the more familiar specifics (taxes, rights and warrants, margin trading, funds and trusts) along with those that are slightly more sophisticated -- puts and calls (trade them against the market trend), dollar-cost-averaging, etc. Just as Mr. Rogers will tell you ""How Not To Buy a Common Stock,"" he won't tell you what common stock to buy; book reviewers too can hedge against a risen market by using taxonomical terms -- like special situation or a small utility item.

Pub Date: June 8th, 1972
Publisher: Arlington House