THE DAY I WAS PROUDEST TO BE AN AMERICAN by Donald Robinson

THE DAY I WAS PROUDEST TO BE AN AMERICAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A collection of personalized anecdotes and reminiscences points with pride to this country's character, beliefs, and actions and is a heartening affirmation at a time of wavering U.S. prestige. All kinds of people are represented- from an Italian barber to a Negro student- looking ahead apprehensively at his admission at a southern law school; from Reinhold Niebuhr to Meany of the AFL; from physicist Edward Teller to Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Elmo Roper, Rosalind Russell, John Foster Dulles. There are small demonstrations of individual heroism, selflessness, generosity, faith; of Americans at war and at peace, at home and abroad; of problems faced and worked on- delinquency, segregation, prejudice, Puerto Rico's ""Operation Bootstrap"", polio, the H-Bomb, etc. etc. By no means sentimental chauvinism, this reasserts its belief in America and Americans at a susceptible level.

Pub Date: Aug. 21st, 1958
Publisher: Doubleday