TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE by Donald Schoa

TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The subtitle is ""The New Heraclitus""; and it may not be entirely flippant of the reader to respond, ""But we haven't worn out the old one yet."" As Mr. Schon points out, there has always been an unresolved conflict in Western thought between the view that ""all things are in process,"" and Parmenides' dictum that everything which is , ""is entire, immovable, and without end."" Nevertheless it has been a deserved truism, in American society at least, that innovation is the only constant factor. Mr. Schon's specific territory within this vast philosophic arena is ""the dynamics of industrial change,"" and he is endowed for his investigations by several years' experience with a leading private industrial research firm, followed by several more as director of the Institute for Applied Technology in the National Bureau of Standards, of the U.S. Dept of Commerce. Such a background, added to an original and rigorously educated mentality, has produced that unusual sort of work which can leap from eternal questions to contemporary problems with ease. If the promised ""Ethic of Change"" is not quite forthcoming in the final chapter, it is certainly made much more attainable hereafter by the book as a whole.

Pub Date: March 31st, 1967
Publisher: Delacorte