MR. PEEKNUFF'S TINY PEOPLE by Donna Hill

MR. PEEKNUFF'S TINY PEOPLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A tiny presumption that just doesn't hold up. From his home atop Mount Peerless, the people below look tiny to Mr. Peeknuff; and so, we're told, he thinks they are tiny--to the point that, when he descends to help them after a ""terrible wind,"" he doesn't recognize the full-sized individuals who, indeed, solicit his aid. ""I must . . . help the tiny people,"" he insists; and he returns home convinced that he ""must have made a wrong turn"" and also convinced, looking down again, that he's ""richer, taller smarter and luckier than anyone in our valley."" In a real fantasy--free of the-things-of-this-world--one might get away with a conceit like this; but any child can see that Mr. Peeknuff didn't acquire his shoes or his cap or the tumbler he drinks his homemade' cider out of without sometimes descending from his mountaintop-perch. An alert child might even wonder how come that ""terrible wind"" was so much stronger down below. With its credibility destroyed, there's nothing left to the story.

Pub Date: April 17th, 1981
Publisher: Atheneum