ANDREW HENRY'S MEADOW by Doris Burn

ANDREW HENRY'S MEADOW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Andrew Henry Thatcher liked to build things—a helicopter for the kitchen, an eagle's cage, a sewing machine powered merry-go-round, an incredibly complex system of pulleys. As is notoriously the case with inventive genius, however, no one around the house appreciated him. So Andrew Henry left home, went to his favorite meadow, and built his own house. Soon eight of his friends, whose special interests had also met with disfavor, joined him, and he specially designed and constructed personalized shelters for each. The large black and white illustrations are similar to Robert McCloskey's in style, and show some of the same sense of imagination and humor. The pictures of the inventions have been splendidly architected. The book's appeal is primarily visual; the text seems mainly a vehicle for the pictures.

Pub Date: Sept. 8th, 1965
ISBN: 0970739923
Publisher: Coward-McCann