A GUIDE TO THE SUPREME COURT by Dorothy A. Marquardt

A GUIDE TO THE SUPREME COURT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A pedestrian and shallow introduction, in which Marquardt briefly traces the status of the Supreme Court from idle beginnings under John Jay; provides baseball-card-level sketches of each Chief Justice, his major decisions, and how he contributed to a definition of the court; summarizes 86 ""landmark decisions"" in one-to-three sentences each; and appends a copy of the Constitution for handy reference. Marquardt's attitude is one of knee-jerk respect, her generalizations are unobjectionable but conventional--as is her style (""forever alert,"" ""precious liberties""); her approach is fragmented, ignoring overall patterns or principles; and she tends to confuse rulings with reality (""Our ideal of equal justice under the law has become a living truth in recent years""). Strictly homework fodder, overshadowed by (among others) Liston's Tides of Justice (1966), Lewis' less general Supreme Court (1966), Habenstreit's Changing America (1970), and Leonard Stevens' recent Constitutional Issues series.

Pub Date: Oct. 12th, 1977
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill