CASSANDRA AT THE WEDDING by Dorothy Baker

CASSANDRA AT THE WEDDING

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Dorothy Baker's first novel in close to fifteen years, while not as memorable as Young Man With a Horn has proved to be, has something of the same compulsion, and it is a story of an intense, ingrown but still exposed and very vulnerable relationship. For Cassandra, who comes to the wedding of her sister, Judith, is her twin, and Judith's marriage will be more than a cleavage of that special, symbiotic twin kinship--almost an amputation. For while Judith has been able to love elsewhere, Cassie has no identity without the other half of herself. The fact that they both have chosen-independently in separate cities- the same dress to wear is the first premonition of the trouble to follow: Judith, sensing it, marries Jack- at a City Hall- before she brings him home, from the airport, to find that Cassie has taken an overdose of sleeping pills. Jack, a doctor, helps to bring her back to life, which may-or may not- have any meaning for her, and at the close, there is the wedding in a church and the ritual words which belie, perhaps only for Cassie, the impediment in this union.... It has a bitter, bright, momentary fascination- to which women will respond, according to the sophistication of their tastes.

Pub Date: Feb. 5th, 1961
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin