COMMON SENSE AND WORLD AFFAIRS by Dorothy Fosdick

COMMON SENSE AND WORLD AFFAIRS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The realm of plain home truths gets a thorough airing as Miss Fosdick in the manner of park bench philosopher states and exemplifies a dozen maxims whose practice would lead towards a sounder relationship between the United States and the rest of the world. Her experiences as teacher, as representative to Dumbarton Oakes and the United Nations and as a policy maker in our State Department have prepared her for the task. Liberal and thoroughly convinced of the present dangers of both communism and an atomic conflagration, Miss Fosdick couches her wisdom in simple general terms that have meaning for most of us:- that it is wise to know when to be afraid; that the future must be kept open; that we must fashion means to ends and so forth. Her illustrations, taken from recent political developments show where nations have taken good and bad courses of action. France for example should have made Vietnam independent and paid the price of implementing an idea. In contrast, the United Nations formed a good laboratory for the working out of Indonesian sovereignty. Our country too, about which she has most to say, has the long road towards prudence to travel:-in learning not to overestimate our generosity, in using respect rather than threats as a deterrent to communism elsewhere, in a judicious rather than wholesale exporting of our institutions, in acting on facts rather than our imagination of them. Heartening advice as far as it goes, this has the brevity and simplicity for popular appeal.

Pub Date: Feb. 10th, 1954
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace