A PRIVATE VIEW OF PUBLIC LIFE by Dorothy Goldberg

A PRIVATE VIEW OF PUBLIC LIFE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is Dorothy Kurgan Goldberg's private view of her public life with Arthur Goldberg, John Kennedy's Secretary of Labor, Associate Justice on the Supreme Court, the Ambassador to the United Nations in that order. Mrs. Goldberg, a professional painter and the author of The Creative Woman, opens up her heart and bares all: she tells how, as the wife of a public figure, she gladly gave up ART for Art. She describes the Washington social scene and the demands it imposes on political wives, as well as the delicate problems and the pressures of the international diplomatic community at the UN. A large part of her book is devoted to anecdotes of the Goldbergs' warm family life: she recalls how her little Bobble once commented ""Nasty old strikers; police ought to come and shoot 'em all dead."" Mrs. Goldberg is an engaging woman even if her book doesn't rise above the level of incidental table talk.

Pub Date: Oct. 27th, 1975
Publisher: Charterhouse/McKay