REPTILES AND HOW THEY REPRODUCE by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

REPTILES AND HOW THEY REPRODUCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Continuing the survey so ably advanced in Frogs, Toads, Salamanders and How They Reproduce (1975), Patent introduces reptiles via their evolutionary origin, describes their structure, senses, ectothermic nature, and signal systems as all of these relate to function, then briefly examines the common features of reptile reproduction before going on to the distinctive patterns of turtles, snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Patent knows how to stimulate curiosity (why should some reptiles lay eggs while others bear live young?) before answering the questions; she is always clear and intelligent on ""what [cited] experiments teach us""; she fills readers in on revolutionary new ideas and findings (endothermic dinosaurs, parental care in crocodiles); and her scientific authority and workmanlike approach don't rule out a passing recognition of the ""rarely graceful"" aspects of ""turtle love"" or a side look at such curious behavior as the male snakes' combat dance. Exemplary, as usual.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1977
Publisher: Holiday House