A WOMAN'S VOICE: A Handbook to Successful Private and Public Speaking by Dorothy Uris

A WOMAN'S VOICE: A Handbook to Successful Private and Public Speaking

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KIRKUS REVIEW

For every Eliza Doolittle, now liberated, who wants to do more -- a hard-working self-improver of voice and diction integrated with practice readings drawn from Lysistrata and Pentimento; poems by Emily Dickinson, Amy Lowell, Erica Jong; a speech by Marya Mannes called ""Can a Woman be President?"". Lifts is a militant speech therapist and correctionist who peppers her how-tos with whatfors. Women's psychological place, she explains, is reflected in speech mannerisms -- likely to be weak, regressive, high-pitched like a little girl. Her drills for freeing the voice begin with relaxing and learning to breathe, and concentrate on the mechanics of articulation, inflection and resonance, with a long, rather prudish lecture on vocabulary according to Webster. There's also cursory coverage of those important public moments: interviews, group or panel discussions, the TV-radio-lecture circuit and, finally, campaigning. A primer of effective rhetoric for the American woman, without bombast.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1975
Publisher: Stein & Day