THE CASE FOR THE WORKING MOTHER by Dorothy Whyte Cotton

THE CASE FOR THE WORKING MOTHER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Between the mystique and McGinley lies the case, and a good one it is, as Miss Cotton propounds, cajoles and reassures. Addressing herself mainly to the women who want to work, and do have a choice, the author, with selected statistics and heady words from academe and business, plunges straight into the ""non-neurotic"" motivations of the average would-be working mother and finds them sound. To be useful in the larger world outside the home, to grow in knowledge and abilities as well as to supplement the family income, are worthy desires equal in importance to the normal and healthy wish to have and raise children, and the two worlds may be happily combined. Although perhaps skimpy on some of the irksome details- managing, and woefully short on specifics such as the horrendous task of finding just the right housekeeper, this pick-me-up for the guilty working mother throws into perspective the familial pulls. The happy child still needs mother, but there is no evidence to show that quantity in time spent with him is more valuable than quality. If the child's interests are ""tuned in on,"" and respected, then when the mother works, he may even gain in self reliance, and respect for her. The author also tackles educational and job opportunities, nursery schools, and everyday problems, but it is that bustling, common sense exorcism of guilt that will propel the guilty from the kitchen.

Pub Date: April 20th, 1965
Publisher: Stein & Day