THE ART OF MAGIC by Douglas and Kari Hunt

THE ART OF MAGIC

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

As broadbased as Gaddis' The Wide World of Magic (previous page), but aimed at a younger audience and less concrete, less detailed, altogether less successful. After an introductory look at the rationale of magic and its history through the Middle Ages, the Hunts breeze through a number of magicians from Cagliostro (eighteenth century) to magic today both amateur and on TV, leaving behind a vague impression of the atmosphere and style each man created; in the same sort of survey, covering many of the same figures. Gaddis described several tricks precisely. Precision comes late here, after the generalized discussion of stage technique (misdirection, preparation, acting, dexterity), when the authors give some step-by-step directions for the classical sleights of hand, card sleights, and cups and balls, accompanied by diagrams. The tricks are rather difficult but clearly explained and fully illustrated. Potential audience seems poorly defined--of the three books in this issue, the least useful.

Pub Date: Oct. 6th, 1967
Publisher: Atheneum