A SURGEON'S FIGHT TO REBUILD MEN by Dr. Fred H. Albert

A SURGEON'S FIGHT TO REBUILD MEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Modest, interesting enough and worthy autobiography of an orthopedic surgeon who from both a medical and a humanitarian standpoint has made a great contribution to humanity. Best known, perhaps, for his greatest surgical innovation, the bone graft operation which he introduced two years after his graduation from Harvard Medical, he traces his interest in the subject to a boyhood on a farm, and the influence of his tree-grafting grandfather. In successive years, he tested and proved his theory on hunchback and tuberculous joints. During the World War, and after, he devoted his time to working with wounded veterans in U S General Hospitals, to plastic surgery, shock treatment, and lastly -- his own installation -- Curative Workshops for the rehabilitation of those treated. His international affiliation grew rapidly after the war, through this work on rehabilitation, particularly with various South American countries as the leading man in the Pan-American Medical Association. Good stuff -- but not inspired writing.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1943
Publisher: Dutton