JEFFERSON AND THE ORDEAL, OF LIBERTY by Dumas Malone

JEFFERSON AND THE ORDEAL, OF LIBERTY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This third volume in this author's series, Jefferson and His Time, covers the nine years between Jefferson's retirement as Washington's Secretary of State in 1793 to his election to the Presidency in 1800-01. The first two volumes of the series deal with Jefferson the Virginian and Jefferson and the Rights of Man; here the author writes of the political, personal and social problems confronting Jefferson (and the new United States) during these nine years. They were years of tension. Foreign relations were clouded by the Terror in Paris, by the misconduct of the French minister to this country, Genet, and by the growing strain between the United States, France and England. At home Jefferson's unfounded criticisms of Washington led to a break with his old friend; his mistrust of Adams and his enmity with Hamilton made him the subject of violent and often unfair attacks in Congress and the press; his leadership of the ""Republicans"" against the Federalists embroiled him in party politics. Even in his new mansion of Monticello he was plagued by agricultural and family differences. In 1800 he accepted the nomination for President, supposedly with reluctance, and after a bitter campaign was elected by one vote when Burr's machinations threw the election to the House of Representatives -- a new President in a new Capital, with a new century opening before him. Dealing in minute detail with every phase of the political scene of the period, this long, unbiased and meticulously documented study will appeal to Jeffersonians and to students of the formative years of American politics. Not for amateur historians.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1962
ISBN: 0813923638
Publisher: Little, Brown