THE ECONOMICS OF THE POLITICAL PARTIES by  E Barris

THE ECONOMICS OF THE POLITICAL PARTIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though it is often stated that our two parties are essentially alike, there are areas of vital differences, and in perhaps no area is the distinction between the parties more apparent, and more significant, than in the realm of economies In this book, the author, a noted economist, discusses clearly, and in some detail, the economic of the two parties and of their leaders. The policies are extracted from political statements, platforms, and legislative proposals; the author also analyzes the policies of the men the Presidents have chosen to help formulate and administer their programs. Mr. Harris surveys the entire range of economic activities: monetary policies and the causes of inflation; the budget, debt management, tax and fiscal policies; , growth, and unemployment; welfare; national resources; and international economics. The author concludes that the Republicans place excessive emphasis on stability of the currency balancing of the budget, and monetary policies against the objectives of growth and treatment of recessions. Mr. Harris' purpose in writing this book was in large part the dissemination of modern economics to the public, and in this he has been highly successful. The book is easily intelligible to the layman and helps form a basis for more informed voting. It is impossible for an economist, committed the years to one party and to Keynsian economics, to write a completely objective book. But, although the author makes no secret of his political he is fair in his assessment of the performance of the last four administrations, and is not altogether uncritical of President Kennedy.

Publisher: Macmillan