THE SENTIMENTAL YEARS by E. Douglas Branch
Kirkus Star

THE SENTIMENTAL YEARS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The years referred to in the title were those between 1835 and 1860, when business, drinking, religion, feminism, home life, literature, even invention were so sentimentally approached that it now seems comic. Douglas Branch has a knack of writing that brings the reader into the time of which he writes. One sees and feels and hears the sights and sounds and activities. The whole is a veritable New York street scene, and there's not a dull line in the book. Branch's interpretation gives the events he describes special meaning. The appeal is very general -- to young and old, to readers of fiction and non-fiction, to men and women. It's a refreshing exhilirating sort of book, and should get the sort of market that Benson's As We Were built up, with the added audience that an American setting insures as against one so typically English. It's a good bet.

Pub Date: Oct. 26th, 1934
Publisher: Appleton-Century