MORNING'S AT SEVEN by E. L. Malpass

MORNING'S AT SEVEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Morning's At Seven is a sunny side up diversion of a divergent British family, much of whose easygoing charm has a knowing naivete. The Pentecosts range from a grandfather and great-aunt down to a devious, intractable and for the most part unavoidable little nipper called Gaylord. Although Gaylord is stubbornly silent about his personal life (and the terrifying threat of the Foggerty boys who bully and brutalize him) he is only too willing to talk about the romances of his aunts, Becky and Rose; about the night his father spends in the attic; etc., etc. And while life begins again with the thought of another Gaylord to come, it also ends with a death in the family, misting over with sentiment an agreeable small book. There are nice touches throughout and Gaylord is a diminutive achievement. The readership may be hard to peg, but it should be there. The publishers suggest Mrs. Miniver: we think Sumner Locke Elliott's Careful, He Might Hear You is more comparable.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1965
Publisher: Viking