STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT DEATH FOR TEENAGERS by Earl A. Grollman

STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT DEATH FOR TEENAGERS

How to Cope with Losing Someone You Love
Age Range: 12 & up
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

 An insightful theologian/grief expert (``the cure for grief is to grieve'') opens with Terry Kettering's attention-grabbing poem, ``The Elephant in the Room.'' Teens' grief--like, Grollman suggests, the huge (but unobserved) elephant--is often overlooked or minimized. Addressing this gap, he presents just a few on- target, incisive lines on each page--to be read, like poetry, with deliberation--on topics such as ``the first days after a death'' and ``facing your future.'' The occasional humor is not inappropriate (``Why is there a special relationship between grandparents and grandchildren? They have a common enemy--the parent''); but the treatment of special relationships and circumstances suffers from Grollman's brevity. He acknowledges that it's normal to feel that one's own grief is the worst; some teens will be disappointed not to find their particular situation treated more fully. Still, all are likely to find consolation in the book as a whole, and in completing (in the concluding workbook pages) statements like ``The last thing I did with you was...'' and ``What scares me the most is...'' (Nonfiction. 12+)

Pub Date: April 26th, 1993
ISBN: 0-8070-2500-3
Page count: 144pp
Publisher: Beacon
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1st, 1993




SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

ChildrenAFTER LIFE by Merrie-Ellen Wilcox
by Merrie-Ellen Wilcox