DAUGHTERS OF CHANGING JAPAN by Earl Herbert Cressy

DAUGHTERS OF CHANGING JAPAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An intriguing interweaving of personal stories of several young Japanese women gives a manysided picture of Japan as it has been in the past, as it is now and as it may become. We witness the influences of clan, Confucianism and feudalism, which Dr. Cressy calls the main roadblocks on the way to a Democracy based on the Christian concept of men as free and equal, in the lives of these appealing and personable young women as they strive to achieve their individuality in a culture that has subjugated their sex. Intermingled with the stories of the sensitive Kazuko, the extroverted Yoko, the Tokyo- educated Michiko and others are fascinating sidelights on lovers' suicides, a Zen Buddhist retreat, the feudal ways and rights of husbands. What was the result of searching for a new equilibrium? Kazuko's fight for freedom did not save her from a feudal husband; Hansko decided in marriage that happiness was a strong personality; classic style Aiko hopes to be a woman of good sense, prudence, faithfulness. The change in the concept of the individual, in the arranging or choice in marriages, in the role of woman is the basic theme of the book.

Pub Date: June 21st, 1955
Publisher: Farrar, Straus