THE RIVER AT SUNDOWN by Earl Murray

THE RIVER AT SUNDOWN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This too-familiar tale by Murray (Flaming Sky, 1995, etc.) opens with the return of Isaac Porter from the blood and bitterness of the Civil War. Isaac, convinced that life will never be peaceful or happy again in his Tennessee River home, strikes out for the frontier, heading to Montana, where he hopes to make his fortune mining gold. Wife Holly, who emerges as the heroine of this saga, and son Jason, fearing for Isaac's wellbeing, soon follow, anxious to find the naive and foolish man before he gets himself into trouble. Unfortunately, they are captured by the Sioux. With the help of a kindly Indian woman, they adapt to Indian ways, and Holly is able to quietly continue her search for her wayward husband. Meanwhile, Isaac, who believes that his wife and son are dead, falls into the company of a band of ruthless outlaws. Though predictable and clichâd, the story is relieved by some colorful frontier characters, accurate historical detail, and a good sense of post-war development in the Montana Territory.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1997
Page count: 320pp
Publisher: Forge/Tor