THE MEMOIRS OF EARL WARREN by Earl Warren
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THE MEMOIRS OF EARL WARREN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A model of discretion and civility, former Chief Justice Earl Warren (d. 1974) makes short work of his many shrill detractors during the controversial years of his court tenure. He will concede that Eisenhower regretted appointing him almost immediately; Ike disliked the historic Brown vs. Board of Education decision which struck down school segregation, and relations between the two cooled permanently. But on the whole, Warren's memoirs are somewhat august and lack either political revelation or gossip value. To those political analysts who marveled at the metamorphosis of Earl Warren the moderate Republican governor of California into Earl Warren the radical upholder of the First Amendment, equal apportionment, and the rights of the accused, Warren says that the change was but an optical illusion. In politics, issues are amenable to piecemeal solutions; the imperatives of justice can't be doled out or curtailed. It's not a wholly satisfactory answer to those who remember that Warren as Attorney-General and Governor of California sanctioned the wartime removal of the Japanese, even though he admits to being ""conscience-stricken"" over the matter ever after. About the Court and its protocol he writes with deep respect, detailing its procedures and the decision-making process; the single acrid note is reserved for the American Bar Association which joined in the anti-Warren revilement of the 1950s. A deliberate and cautious memoir, this also is a testimonial to the integrity of the judicial system that Warren so long embodied.

Pub Date: June 3rd, 1977
Publisher: Doubleday