AFTER THE COSSACKS BURNED DOWN THE ""Y by Eddy Gilmore

AFTER THE COSSACKS BURNED DOWN THE ""Y

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an acount of the author's visit to Russia this year. Gilmore has been a foreign correspondent for 23 years and after World War II he spent twelve years in Russia. He returned to the Soviet Union with his Russian wife (a naturalized American citizen) on a six weeks tourist visa though he was working for the Associated Press. The Gilmores travelled by train from Holland and upon first re-entering the Soviet Union noticed that there had been great changes since 1953. As a rule they were courteously met and encountered a number of conveniences for travellers unheard of before ""de-Stalinization"". Restaurants were livelier and offered better service, shops were better stocked, food prices were down although certain items were still priced relatively high by American standards. The Gilmores visited Stalin's birthplace and found the Georgians understandably reluctant to discuss current Russian opinion of their native son. But the great majority of Russians they spoke with regarded Khrushchev with respect and affection. Gilmore's book is not primarily political although he has a number of enlightening things to say about current politics. His account, however, would have been far less distracting if he had bypassed the temptation to be amusing.

Pub Date: Feb. 24th, 1964
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Co.