THE INFINITE WOMAN by Edison Marshall

THE INFINITE WOMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A complex character was Lola Montero, born Lucia Riley - and at numerous points suggesting resemblances to that romantic figure, Lola Montez. In the best romantic dramatic tradition, Edison Marshall has drawn her as a ""goddess of fertility"", realizing the goal of women of beauty, but inwardly torn by the dual attraction of an idealistic, penniless French journalist, and magnetic, devil-ridden, evil Lord Lundy. An Indian childhood, dominated by the worship of strange gods to which her native servant, Manu, introduced her, was rudely interrupted with her Irish father's death, her selfish mother's second marriage, her abrupt return to England and a Scottish step-grandmother. Rebellion - a youthful determination to set her own sights and realize her ambitions- resulted in a tumultuous, tempestuous career. Briefly married, she went back to India, only to rebel against orthodoxy again, and to return- in disgrace- to Europe, where she carved out a spectacular success as a dancer -- toast of a continent -- mistress of Ludwig of Bavaria and a Countess in her own right. Finally, politics behind her, she became common law wife of Rene, now a byword and power in French journalism, always her good angel. But Lord Lundy, thwarted before in his determination to break her if he could not have her, caused his death- and Lola, with Manu again her guardian, brought their checkered romance to a melodramatic end on the edge of the mine pits of Lord Lundy's estate. Colorful, fast paced, overladen with picaresque details, but bolding reading for those who enjoy passionate adventure.

Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1950
Publisher: Farrar, Straus