LAND BEYOND THE RIVERS by Edith Brookway

LAND BEYOND THE RIVERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The time is 1754; Fort Necessity falls to the French and Braddock's stupidity prevents the English from taking Fort Duquesne. George Washington is 22 and learning valuable lessons about fighting and leading men. Maturity is a relative thing. Our hero, Alan Pepperill, is three years younger. He is captured by the Indians, made a blood brother of the tribe, and eventually escapes to fight at Washington's side. The descriptions of frontier life and Indian customs are interesting, but 19 year old Alan is totally unbelievable. He behaves like a twelve year old, a pattern not designed for survival in that place at that time. Although he does think of himself as a child, unloved and unwanted, it is difficult to share or sympathize with his surprise when an Indian girl asks him to marry her. A further strain on the willing suspension of disbelief is the Indian acceptance of a tall, muscular man who acts like a boy.

Pub Date: April 11th, 1966
Publisher: Westminster