THE BIBLE'S LEGACY FOR WOMANHOOD by Edith Deen

THE BIBLE'S LEGACY FOR WOMANHOOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Edith Deen's All of the Women of the Bible (1955) was biographical in intent, while this work professes to be interpretative. Actually the author engages largely in expounding (with considerable skill) examples of virtue and deploring instances of vice in Old and New Testament ladies, endorsing the spiritual standards set therein. Though it provides abundant detail on the kitchen equipment, foods, flowers, fabrics, jewelry and ointments of the women of the Book, her study is inadequate in its confrontation of contemporary challenges to Biblical morality and the sexual status quo. Mrs. Deen successfully highlights the substantial contributions of early Jewish and Christian women and the positive aspects of their feminine role, but she does not deal with the misogyny inherent in some of the Scriptural attitudes toward woman and her place. A strictly literal interpretation prevents any examination of the Bible stories as folklore or sociological records. Thus this is a work purely for the religiously-oriented seeking inspiration and moral uplift from Biblical lessons.

Pub Date: Feb. 6th, 1969
Publisher: Doubleday