THE HISTORY OF THE U.S. SIGNAL CORPS by Editors of the Army Times

THE HISTORY OF THE U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

On the 100th anniversary of the Army's Signal Corps, this well-informed, profusely-illustrated book appears to tell its colorful story. The first of the text-- dealing with Major Albert Myer's efforts to organize the corps around the time of the Civil War--is especially interesting. It is from this we learn that Myer had first been concerned in developing a sign language for deaf mutes, and that this system later became a flag signalling operation against the Indians in the West, and against the Confederate Army in 1861. The book also tells of early balloon and telegraph work, the reporting of the engagements, later training of homing pigeons, Polar research, right into Twentieth Century experiments with flying, wireless, and the tremendous growth and use of the Corps in both World Wars. In the later sections, the story of how radar spotted the Japanese on their way to Pearl Harbor---and why the information was ignored--- make heart-breaking reading.

Publisher: Putnam