WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST by Edmond D.- Ed Coblentz

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A sentimental push for the ""boss"" and exactly what the subtitle, ""A Portrait in His Own Words""- implies. There is a series of Hearst's editorial and anecdotal writings as they deal with and excuse their author for each of the episodes in his life. Through them Hearst emerges as a fantastic epitome of American ideals. If he had for instance, as the interpolations of Mr. Coblentz suggest, been happy at his schools, St. Paul's and Harvard, he would have been a sissy or just another ""nice"" boy. And Hearst's plea to the world to let him make his own mistakes, was another of his so called ""loveable, human traits"". After Coblentz's worshipful introduction born of his own admiration and affection for the man (Coblentz has been supervising editor of the Hearst papers)- or at least the ""human"", ""patriotic"" man Hearst wished to appear, this seems a mockery of a tribute to a man turned devil at the hands of accessible financial power and the absence of love.

Pub Date: June 20th, 1952
Publisher: Simon & Schuster