WHITE SAILS CROWDING by Edmund Gilligan

WHITE SAILS CROWDING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There is none of the turgid, semi-Joycian quality of the much disputed Boundary Against Night. This book has a unity of plot which the first lacked; it has some fine lyrical sea writing. It savors of its period, even down to a blurring of characterization, and obscurity of certain aspects. The story deals with a young law student who deserts Cambridge for a year halibut fishing off the Banks. It tells of gales, of rigors, of shipwrecks on a bleak island, of being nursed back to life by the daughter of the house. Together they dream of escape, and find it within reach -- but they are cheated. The rescue ship is the deserted Susan; the famine-stricken island has need for her stores; an iceberg traps them, as they think they are escaping. Eventually a Boston-bound boat takes them off. The appeal is largely for men -- those that like sea stories.

Pub Date: Nov. 6th, 1939
Publisher: Scribner