THE LAND AND PEOPLE OF RHODESIA by Edna Mason Kaula

THE LAND AND PEOPLE OF RHODESIA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Outspokenly advocating continued white rule and generally favorable to the Smith government's unilateral declaration of independence, this would not please the majority of black Rhodesians; nevertheless, despite the dubious treatment of recent political events and a trace of white settler mentality throughout, it does have much of value for the American student. Particularly fascinating is the account of the controversy over the origins of the ruins of Zimbabwe; related and also interesting is the history of the various peoples--especially the Mashona and Matabele whose hostility continues to influence Rhodesian affairs. The structure and customs of village life are presented positively, the magic divided into constructive (witch doctors) and destructive (witch finders). Separate chapters treat advances resulting from applications of agronomy and medicine; that on education places perhaps overmuch emphasis on the work of well-meaning individuals and organizations. Problems of building the Kariba Dam and of conserving wildlife bring us to the present and the chief sticking point, representative government; here informed African opinion would have provided a better balance. This is one that librarians will have to weigh according to their own book selection policies.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1967
Publisher: Lippincott