SHOOTING AT SHARPEVILLE by

SHOOTING AT SHARPEVILLE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Ambrose Reeves is the Bishop of Johannesburg. This book is an account of the shooting in Sharpeville township in the Transvaal on Monday, March 21, 1960. The author's position is in direct opposition to the ""official"" version of the tragedy and he supports his contention with a straightforward account of what seems to be the irrefutable facts and with thirty photographs taken at the scene of the shooting. In resistance to the ""pass"" law the Pan African Congress had called on Africans to stay away from work on March 21st. But the group that assembled at the Sharpeville Police Station were there for various reasons, some to protest, some out of simple curiosity. The police opened fire on the crowd, killing 67 and injuring 186 and the authorities have continued to justify the action and have even commended the police force. Bishop Reeves feels that the Sharpeville incident has consequences far beyond the immediate disastrous results and that it will, in fact, be considered a watershed in South African affairs. His book is a persuasive and moving testament.

Pub Date: Jan. 31st, 1961
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin