NONQUEROR OF MOUNT MCKINLEY by Edward A. Herron
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NONQUEROR OF MOUNT MCKINLEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Hudson Stuck's life story is a natural for hero worshippers. He left England in the late 19th century bound for Australia expecting to live only a few years as the victim of tuberculosis. His bunkmate, Bristol, was under a death sentence, too. Bound in chains, he was being returned for execution. When the ship ran aground in Texas, Bristol seized the chance to jump overboard and the hopeless Stuck followed to aid his chained companion. The two very different men continued to influence each other's destinies from that point on. Starting as cowboys, the burly Bristol made a career as a land-owning cattleman. The slender Stuck became first a school teacher and, under the Bishop's influence, took orders as an piscopal priest. His frontier congregations faced him with the necessity for sermons on their rough justice which he stood up, unarmed, to call murder. Eventually, he rose to Dean of St. Matthew's Cathedral in Dallas. But Bristol had run off to Alaska rather than face extradition. When the opportunity came to go as a missionary to that wilderness territory, Dean Stuck insisted on going. With characteristic energy, he established schools and hospitals, while ministering to Indians and Eskimos by dogsled and fighting off all attempts to bilk them of their birthrights. All this, and he led the first successful party to climb Mt. Mckinley. A well told story of a remarkable man: priest/missionary/explorer/geographer.

Pub Date: April 20th, 1964
Publisher: Messner