THEY'D RATHER BE RIGHT by Edward ain

THEY'D RATHER BE RIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The underpinnings of any group are the numbers and kinds of young people tracted to it. No exception is the ""Liberal Establishment"" and Cain (an established liberal) examines the recruiting methods of the fascinating, encroaching Conservatives--methods, results, and reasons why. Ayn Rand and her ""philosophy""; Buckley and his thunderbolts in print; Welch and his peculiarities; and the ubiquitous, always interesting Goldwater are taken up and examined in separate essays. The Conservative soft well of Viereck and Rossiter share a chapter. The history and implications of growing campus activity on the right is well reported. Bad marks to Mr. Cain for his over- readings and his too ready interpretations of the various surveys concerning the young Conservative. (This sort of thing drives the old Conservative into musth.) Like so many statistical ventures into prophecy, some of these surveys are vulnerable at either the control or the question points--or both. In his essay ""Other Decades on the Right"", Cain makes the point that between 1931 and 1940, there were only seven articles on conservatism listed in Readers' Guide and none from '45- '47. After that, the conservative press belched into life--between that and liberal astonishment, periodical literature on aspects of conservatism now abounds. Reading ourselves for the past six months, we find that this is the fourth of its kind reported.

Pub Date: Aug. 5th, 1963
Publisher: Macmillan