HANNAH AND THE PEACOCKS. by Edward Caddick

HANNAH AND THE PEACOCKS.

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Edward Caddick's first novel Paddy on Sundays (1965) did have the direct youthful appeal of Paddy, a singular small boy. Hannah, older, twentyish, an pair girl, is also a nice character but she's involved with an impossible (unpleasant) group of people and in turn in an impossible (providential) chain of events. When first seen, Hannah is taking care of the little boy of the Sedgewicks (Mrs. Sedgewick, is an absentee mother; Mr. Sedgewick's a lecher); she is engaged to Godfrey with a demandingly dependent mother who has canonized herself ever since his biological point of reference. After a squalid scene she gets rid of Hannah who turns to Roger, kept by an older homosexual. Eventually, conveniently, they all end up in Tangier: Hannah and the Sedgewicks; Roger and his patron; Godfrey and another queer; and amid the seedy, aphrodisiac nightspots, Hannah is exposed to more (all the ""dirty little poufs"") than any young girl should experience. Caddick is an able writer, with a sure sense of dialogue and detail; it is too bad that it is applied here to people who make very little inroads on your sympathies with the exception of Hannah and the rather inert Godfrey.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1967
Publisher: Little, Brown