THE AMERICAN WILDERNESS AND ITS FUTURE: Conservation Versus Use by Edward F. Dolan

THE AMERICAN WILDERNESS AND ITS FUTURE: Conservation Versus Use

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A well-written, succinct summary covers the major controversies over use or preservation. Distinguishing among conservationists who support ""multiple use"" (including recreation, logging, and mining), preservationists who want to keep wild land untouched, and environmentalists who link preservation to global environmental problems, Dolan presents the history of national parks, forests, and wilderness areas and the threats they face. To personalize the issues, he includes italicized examples: e.g., smog might keep the reader from seeing much at the Grand Canyon. But Dolan's ideas for avoiding crowding problems suffer from somewhat patronizing phrasing, and parts of the book are already dated: some species of salmon have been declared endangered (Dolan does mention the effects of this decision), and no mention is made of Bush's attempt to redefine wetlands to allow housing development, a major flip-flop for the ""environmental president."" In general, though, Dolan fairly presents all sides, calling in the end for compromise. Extensive source notes and bibliography; b&w photo insert and index not seen.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1992
Page count: 144pp
Publisher: Watts