NAPLES AND CAMPANIA REVISITED by Edward Hutton

NAPLES AND CAMPANIA REVISITED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Hutton's books on Italy are better known to the English travelers than the American, but the scarcity of reading material about Naples and its surrounding countryside makes evident the need for this book, the first written since the war, with enough of the changes wrought by war to make it immediate in its value. Hutton finds the changes more those caused by trippers, motor cars, the mechanical noises -- and the Americans, than by the damage caused by war itself. But Naples has its side streets and allies, its Tuscan gate and market much as they've always been, and the incomparable Bay and landscape offset the witches' cauldron of the city itself. Hutton balances his sharing of things to see with background of history and the contributions made at successive periods, from the early Greek settlements, through the invading Barbarian hordes, to successive conquests-Norman, Hohenstaufens, the Angevins, the House of Aragon, the Viceroys of the Spanish crown, the Austrians, Joseph Bonaparte --and at last United Italy. From the city itself, he stems out to the campania, to Vesuvius and its environs, to Casttellammare, Sorrento, Amalfi, Ravello, to Capri, the famous abbeys and monasteries, and finally to Benevento. Rich in tradition and history, in color and drama, here is the southern reach of Italy.

Pub Date: July 24th, 1959
Publisher: David McKay