THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION by Edward J. Jurjl

THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author conceives the study of the phenomenology of religion as a scientific discipline, invoking as data the affirmations of engaged believers, and striving to formulate judgments which correspond with a devotee's conception of truth. The basic thesis underlying this study is that, ""steeped in nature, molded by culture, and sharpened by intuition as well as environment, the phenomenon of religion manifests a transcendant, existential significance"". The first part of the volume deals with topics of National, Social, and Theological Scope, including Religion and the Stature of Nations, How Religions Live, and The Idea of God and The History of Religions. Part Two covers the Relevance to The History of Religions, dealing with The Phenomenon of Hinduism, of Buddhism, and the Near East religions--Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Scientism, humanism, nationalism, secularism, historicism, and communism are described as modern rivals to religions of faith. A postscript emphasizes the necessity of taking seriously the crisis arising out of the recrudescence of world religions. The tone of the book is judicious and scholarly, and the style very readable.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1963
Publisher: Westminster