ZACH TAYLOR'S LITTLE ARMY by Edward J. Nichols

ZACH TAYLOR'S LITTLE ARMY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When Texas won its independence from Mexico to become a Republic, the Mexican military swore to take that great territory once again. They were not able to do so however, nor was there sufficient cause to mount a popular war in the north, until in 1845 Texas decided to enter the American union. Immediately trouble broke out along the border. The U.S., with its small army and navy, had little available to defend Texas. But they did possess a seasoned, Indian-fighting general who was able to raise and lead a small force down from New Orleans to meet the threat. He was Zachary Taylor, and with him rode the young officers who would someday become famous in another, greater war; men like Grant, Meade, Longstreet, Magruder, Hooker, and Hill. In spite of squabbling among the staff and constant criticism from Washington, Taylor reached Matamoros in 1846 to drive the Mexicans back from their own border and south. How Taylor's and other small expeditionary groups drove the enemy constantly back, and how the Americans defeated Santa Anna's vastly larger army near Monterrey, becomes a legend of military skill and bravery. Taylor's reward, of course, is well known. America elected him its 12th President. Although the story of Taylor's campaign is well known, this fine little book gives us a fresh view of a great American, as well as valuable details of the force which fought so well under him.

Publisher: Doubleday