THE MICHIGAN MURDERS by Edward Keyes

THE MICHIGAN MURDERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Keyes, co-author with Robin Moore of The French Connection, pieces together the murders of seven coeds in and around Ann Arbor during 1967-1969--murders of extraordinary ferocity and horror. In some ways, when you have multiple murders (apparently an eighth in California was performed by the same killer), false leads and then a hard suspect, a trial and a conviction, your book writes itself, thrill by thrill. Unlike Capote in In Cold Blood-in which another small midwestern town faces multiple murder--Keyes does not get chummy with the young killer, now serving a life sentence, and so does not drill as deeply into the nature of madness as one might hope. This can be explained. James Nolan Armstrong is convicted only of one murder (the others are still listed as unsolved); in hopes of eventual parole he obviously won't confess and saddle himself with ali these deaths. But the fiendish cruelties wreaked upon each victim point to one hand at work as surely as if it were Rodin's. Keyes keeps the suspense taut, brings everyone smartly to life (even visiting psychic Peter Hurkos), and paces us satisfyingly to the final words of the jury foreman: ""We find the guilty--Excuse me. We find the defendant quilty. . ."" Bloody and absorbing.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1976
ISBN: 0472034464
Publisher: Reader's Digest--dist. by T. Y. Crowell