DECISIVE RATTLES OF THE BIBLE by Edward Longstreth

DECISIVE RATTLES OF THE BIBLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The historical narration of the Bible has long been tacitly accepted as allegorical in significance. Modern archaeological research, however, has disclosed much to contravene this view, indicating the validity of various statistics concerning troops, supplies, and the fluctuations of Hebrew power. Beginning with a general topographical survey of Palestine, Longstreth traces the temporal struggles of the People of the Covenant from the time of Abraham, Moses, and Joshua through the First Armageddon, Gldeon's persuasive strategy, the relationship of David and Absalom, Solomon's permissive administration, the captivity and the Persian liberation, the Maccabees, the Alexandrian conquest, and the dawn of the Christian era. Longstreth indicates that Scriptural history is primarily concerned with conflicts in which moral issues were involved, less so with events of purely secular importance. The Bible ""seldom explains how (a battle) was fought, unless during the action the Lord...actively intervened to effect the outcome."" The dissertation pivots upon a theological fulcrum, firmly assigning the Old Testament to the role of overture to the New Testament.

Pub Date: Nov. 12th, 1962
Publisher: Lippincott