THEY WORK WITH WILDLIFE by Edward R. Ricciuti

THEY WORK WITH WILDLIFE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A realistic and readable introduction to different kinds of work with wildlife--especially good on low-profile occupations (like game warden) and the people in them. Ricciuti, a nature writer (To the Brink of Extinction, Plants in Danger) and one-time curator of publications for the New York Zoological Society, also retraces his own route from young naturalist to metropolitan reporter and then, via a pharmaceutical ""espionage"" assignment and more science courses, into magazine-editing and finally freelancing: indicative, like the other career-profiles, of the role of chance, the need to capitalize on opportunity, the built-in drawbacks (in his case, insecurity). Ricciuti's background as a crime reporter also explains his appreciative account of the perils and importance of wildlife law enforcement--intercepting yachtsmen stealing lobster pots for a lark or running the ""snakescam sting"" to curb the illegal trade in reptiles. (""To be a game warden, or at least a good one, you must take your job extremely seriously."") Jobs in wildlife management are illustrated, unexpectedly, by the operation of Remington Arms' Chesapeake Bay outpost, Remington Farms--set up to demonstrate ""how to manage wild animals on agricultural land"" (for the benefit of the crops and the yield--money, game--from hunting). Also covered, with real-life examples and helpful particulars, are: field biology and marine biology; caring for wildlife in captivity; museum and zoo education; and--in the impressive up-from-fire-lookout person of international watchdog Robert F. Scott--administration. Intelligent, varied, and plain-spoken.

Pub Date: Sept. 28th, 1983
Publisher: Harper & Row