I LEARNED ABOUT WOMEN FROM THEM by

I LEARNED ABOUT WOMEN FROM THEM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A New York obstetrician who spent 40 years in a prominent, and fashionable, practise at Columbia-Presbyterian and on Park Avenue looks back on what he learned in general about men, women and marriage from this particularly empathetic doctor-patient rapport, and on the overall problems of his specialty. The opening general chapters include a few psychological platitudes about women as wives, rather than mothers, and Dr. Damon is much more effective when he gets down to the specifics of pregnancies and deliveries. Fertility work fascinated him and challenged him, and he gives a good deal of medically sound advice about conception, and follows through to many affiliated areas: adoption; abortion and the unmarried mother; the menopause and gratuitous surgery; etc., etc. As a confidant-intercessor in all kinds of intimate domestic situations, he has a caseload of consultation-room problems and experiences to pass on which women cannot help but find interesting, whether their condition is or not.

Pub Date: Nov. 23rd, 1962
Publisher: McKay