WOMEN GAIN A PLACE IN MEDICINE by Edythe Lutzker

WOMEN GAIN A PLACE IN MEDICINE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The step-by-step struggle for women's medical education in Great Britain, seen primarily in the determined efforts of Sophia Jex-Blake from 1869-1878. Resistance came from many quarters, more often from the students (at the University of Edinburgh) than from the faculty, and she spent a great deal of her time in legal battles. Four other women joined her quite early but Sophia did most of the arguing; eventually, she ""established"" the London School of Medicine for Women (i.e. arranged for professors to give lectures) to satisfy the licensing requirements. Parliament had to intervene when the universities were indecisive about interpreting regulations but in 1877 both Sophia and friend Edith Pechey were licensed. A well-written account with the Victorian vagaries incorporated as partial explanation for the opposition.

Pub Date: April 15th, 1969
Publisher: McGraw-Hill