THE CAVENDISH LABORATORY by Egon Larsen

THE CAVENDISH LABORATORY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Cavendish Laboratory since its foundation under James Clerk Maxwell in 1871 has set the stage for some of the most startling and significant scientific achievements in the history of man. Here is a careful survey of each discovery made in the quiet balls and research labs of this unpretentious building at Cambridge, England. From Maxwell's momentous discovery that light is an electromagnetic phenomenon to Perutz and Crick's advanced work in genetics, the leaders of Cavendish have been synonomous with the immortals of science. J. J. Thomson and Sir James Chadwick discovered the electron and neutron respectively; Walton and Cockcroft succeeded in merging the atoms of two elements; Rutherford split the atom; and both World Wars were won from a technical viewpoint by the efforts of the Cavendish teams. Present experiments probe time and space and seek answers as always to the question of Universal origin. Egon Larsen injects his study with spirit and clarity insuring its acceptance by the layman.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1962
Publisher: Watts